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World War ll London Blitz:  Buy On Smashwords
I am the great-granddaughter of Ruby Side Thompson. 
Recently I started re-reading the World War ll journals and felt that they were such an important part of a history that will soon be forgotten if not published and shared with the world. These diary excerpts are not the entirety of what is published in print and kindle.
Ruby grew up during a time when education was just beginning to be encouraged for both upper and middle class women. During the late 1890's Ruby explored many radical political ideas of London, England. She met many famous people including the writers George Bernard Shaw and William Butler Yeats. 
5.0 out of 5 stars A choice pick, not to be overlooked, November 6, 2011 By Midwest Book Review (Oregon, WI USA)

World War ll London Blitz: 9-19-40 One night last week, over three hundred men, women, and children were destroyed in a school, to which they had been taken “for safety” after their homes had been destroyed. There is no safety in London anywhere. Hell! Hell! Goddamn Hitler.

Eight raids today. Eight warnings. This is the worse day yet. Last night was terrible. London is the main objective. Here in Romford, Victoria Road was hit for the second time; three stores and four houses demolished there. On Eastern Road, the Inland Revenue Offices were destroyed, and on South Street, Jays, the furniture shop.

9-19-40
The night was awful. There is indiscriminate bombing against London. The BBC said the casualties were again very heavy. In central London over ninety known to be killed, and more than three hundred severely wounded. Oxford Street, Berwick Street, Berkley Square, Piccadilly, Grosvenor Square, Marble Arch, all got it last night. This is just plain murder. One night last week, over three hundred men, women, and children were destroyed in a school, to which they had been taken “for safety” after their homes had been destroyed. There is no safety in London anywhere. Hell! Hell! Goddamn Hitler.

9-20-40
Last night was a most awful night. The warning was given at eight p.m. and our guns went into action immediately. Right here in Romford, it was one of the most terrifying nights of the war. Bombs seemed to be falling all around us. Plessis had been bombed on the previous night. They employ seven thousand people. Luckily, no one had been killed. Walthamstow has been particularly badly hit. In one “rescue” school, three hundred and ninety-three people had been killed in one raid. When the raids began again, the women of Walthamstow began screaming. The A.R.P. wardens had to remove them forcibly, “and their screaming was awful.”




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